Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 26 October 2007 13:38

Intel?s new Arizona production plant opens

Written by David Stellmack

ImageImage

Fab 32 starts Penryn production



Intel’s
new $3 billion factory in Chandler, Arizona opened for production on Thursday, October 24th. The new Intel plant is known as Fab 32. It will mass produce chipsets with circuits nearly one-third smaller than previously made, with a design known as Penryn.

Penryn has circuits that are only 45 nanometers wide, compared to the standard circuit width of 65 nanometers. To get a better idea of the miniature size, a nanometer is equal to a billionth of one meter.  The Penryn chipsets will be used in desktop computers, laptops and also in servers that run computer networks.  Intel has imposed a tight deadline for its shipment of Penryn processors, as they are scheduled to hit the retail sales market on November 12th.

The Penryn design is considered a huge breakthrough in technology as smaller circuits generally provide faster computing speeds with less energy consumption and produce less heat inside the computing device. Smaller chipset design also allows for better use of space and more productivity, as more circuits can be fit into a smaller area of the motherboard.

Intel is rushing to get its 45nm chipsets into the marketplace as quickly as possible to gain an edge over its competitor, AMD.  AMD currently manufactures its chipsets using the 65nm technology and will not begin producing the 45nm version until sometime in 2008.


Last modified on Friday, 26 October 2007 14:18

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments