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Wednesday, 17 October 2007 12:43

So much data, what to do with it?

Written by David Stellmack

Image

U.S. Colleges using online storage


The advent
of every college student having a PC has put a tremendous burden on some U.S. colleges as they struggle to keep up with the ever increasing demand for storage for data and security of the data that is stored.  Some universities and colleges are using hosted online storage services to keep up with the needs of their faculty and students who are storing growing amounts of research information and data.

The Graduate School of Public Health at The University of Pittsburgh has begun rolling out the MozyPro online backup service for its faculty and staff members from EMC Corporation’s Berkeley Data System, Inc. unit.  The University sought outside assistance after growing concern over its lack of unified backup systems and has initially purchased 90 MozyPro licenses along with 200GB of storage.  The online service is only available for faculty and staff members and is not offered to students, as students will be offered some storage on the University’s central Unix system.

Duke University has launched a fee-based storage program that will allow its students, staff and faculty to store personal data on Iron Mountain Inc.’s Connected Backup for PC service.  This service allows users to use as much capacity as they need and to pay for only what they need. Duke’s students have 5GB free storage for university-related files on the University’s WebFiles online storage system, a new online system that is being used for group collaboration, coursework, video streaming and Web site construction projects.  Duke indicated that it is using online storage to increase capacity without impacting the integrity of the University infrastructure or IT operations.

Read more here.

 

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 17 October 2007 14:10

David Stellmack

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