Published in PC Hardware

Intel Kaby Lake mobile ULV chips coming in Q2 2017

by on24 August 2016


Quad-core 15W ultrabooks, 18W gaming notebooks next year

A  report from the folks at NotebookCheck.net shows an Intel slide detailing some updates to the company’s mobile ULV processor lineup based on the Kaby Lake third-generation 14nm processor lineup.

As we mentioned in July, Intel is describing Kaby Lake mostly as a “2017 platform” and plans to launch some desktop processors in the fourth quarter of this year, but will have larger volumes planned for Q1 2017 and will probably announce them formally at next year’s CES.

Quad-core ULV chips arriving for the first time

With Skylake, Intel currently has its mobile processors separated into three categories – “Y”-series (Core M) for 2-in-1 notebooks, “U”-series for thin and light notebooks, and “H”-series for gaming notebooks (with unlocked “HK” and “HQ” quad-core variants). The lineup includes some chips with Intel HD Graphics (listed as “+ 2” for “Tier 2”), while others feature upgraded Intel Iris Graphics (listed as “+ 3e” for “Tier 3”).

notebookcheck intel kaby lake ulv slide

Source: NotebookCheck.net

“U” series gets a quad-core 15W design

There will not be any new chip configurations for Core M from Skylake to Kaby Lake, as the new generation will also feature dual-core CPUs with Intel HD Graphics and a 6W TDP. According to the source, however, the Kaby Lake “U” series will be receiving a new quad-core variant with Intel HD Graphics inside a 15W TDP. This will be placed alongside two current dual-core CPUs with Intel Iris Graphics (3e) in 15W and 28W designs.

“H” gaming series gets a quad-core 18W design

The Kaby Lake “H” gaming series will also be receiving a quad-core design with Intel HD Graphics inside a remarkable 18W TDP.

Not much has been reported about the Kaby Lake notebook processor lineup yet, other than the integrated GPUs will be be capable of supporting High Dynamic Range (HDR) content, Wide Color Gamut (Rec.2020) and HDCP 2.2 playback. This is a great value for consumers seeking thin and lightweight ultrabook lineups that don’t necessarily have physical room for a dedicated GPU, but still want to experience 4K Ultra HD and similar resolutions with the benefit of a wider color spectrum output.

Last modified on 12 September 2016
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