The FCC begins an almighty cock-up
Published in News

Mega mergers will not provide low-access areas affordable rates

The Federal Communications Commission underwent a change in administration just two weeks ago and is already seeking to change the landscape of provisions from prior terms that could end up stifling efforts to assist low-access areas and upend net neutrality provisions for smaller mom-and-pop websites.

New FCC chairman remains undecided on net neutrality
Published in News

First open meeting reveals committment to building digital divide

The most recent Federal Communications Chairman, Ajit Pai, who took office earlier last week, has made a commitment to reduce regulatory barriers to growth and innovation and prioritize building the digital divide, a national social inequality measurement on access to internet services.

AT&T and Verizon respond to FCC's zero-rating concerns
Published in Mobiles

Unaffiliated mobile video operators end up footing the bill

A few weeks ago, Verizon and AT&T came under fire by the FCC for violating principles of net neutrality through the use of “zero-rating” data promotions.

FCC Chairman Wheeler to quit in January
Published in News

Title II reclassification became signature achievement

The current chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Tom Wheeler, said that he will resign at the end of the current presidential administration in January, during a tenure driven by increasing consumer protection in the satellite and cable industies while overseeing an escalating court battle over Title II broadband reclassification policy.

Verizon gets fined for secretly tracking customers without opt-out
Published in Mobiles

Violated FCC's Open Internet Transparency Rule

In 2014 and 2015, Verizon was found secretly inserting a small piece of web code into all mobile web traffic to track its customers for advertisement purposes. The so-called “supercookies” were unavoidable, with no way to opt-out, even if customers opted out of advertisements. As of this week, the wireless giant finally had the case settled in court at the tune of a rather small $1.35 million fine by the FCC.

FCC now lets Americans use their own cable set-top boxes
Published in News

A powerful win for the free market economics

In a sweeping change of course directed at a tightly controlled television industry, cable and satellite operators in the United States will now be obligated to let their customers freely choose which set-top boxes they can use, according to a proposal announced by the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday.


Launching later this month


Bing holds onto your IP address for “only” six months

Looks like it will hit trouble