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Wednesday, 05 January 2011 16:32

Sandy Bridge facing limited availability

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Handful of shops in EU have stock
Intel isn't in the habit of making a mess of its launch schedules, but we must note the Sandy Bridge launch was anything but smooth.

Two days after the official launch the new CPUs are extremely hard to come by and only four SKUs are currently listed as available on our price search engine. The choice of motherboards is quite a bit better, but at the moment only a handful of 2000-series parts are available, but in most markets they are still nowhere to be found. Even the few shops that currently list them as available don't have many in stock.

The Core i5-2300 and 2400 are clocked at 2.8GHz and 3.1GHz respectively, but they both sell for €179. Of course, the prices will be different once they become available in greater volumes. The 3.3GHz Core i5 2500 sells for €209, while the Core i7 2600 goes for €292. Bear in mind that the 2600 is a Core i7 part, so it has 8MB of cache and few more features.

In contrast, more than 30 Socket 1155 motherboards are currently available in the EU with prices ranging from as little as €79 for basic H67 boards to a sobering €277 for Gigabyte's top notch P67 motherboard.
Last modified on Wednesday, 05 January 2011 16:58
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+5 #1 East17 2011-01-05 17:26
I have the feeling that this launch was very rushed. They probably know that Brazos already delivered a crushing blow to Atom's image and that effectively everybody is embracing the platform being happy they got rid of the low performance Atom platforms with Intel's limitations.

Also, I think they KNOW that Llano and Bulldozer are going to be perfect hits and they want to capitalize on the HYPE that they've built around SB.

Because, once Llano and Bulldozer hit the market, Intel's sales will have some real competition to combat.
 
 
-7 #2 inextinguishable 2011-01-05 18:14
official Sandy Bridge's launch will take place at CES one 45 minutes afterward I writing this commends. So maybe soon they arrive to the stores :)
 
 
+6 #3 Exodite 2011-01-05 18:28
Quoting East17:
I have the feeling that this launch was very rushed. They probably know that Brazos already delivered a crushing blow to Atom's image...

It's not like Brazos will make up for the lack of desktop Sandy Bridge parts though.

I'm with you as far as Intel rushing the launch to get a big head start on AMDs upcoming desktop platform but it's not realistic to expect Bulldozer to offer better per-core performance than Sandy Bridge.

I'd love to be wrong, as I prefer the AMD platform, but I doubt that's going to happen.
 
 
0 #4 The_Countess 2011-01-05 19:49
Quoting Exodite:
[quote name="East17"]but it's not realistic to expect Bulldozer to offer better per-core performance than Sandy Bridge.


because its significantly smaller on a per core basis, it doesn't need to be.
 
 
+3 #5 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-05 22:36
Does "per-core" performance still matter?... If value is on AMD's side Sandy Bridge won't matter that much, maybe only to enthusiasts with deep pockets and fanboys.
 
 
-2 #6 Naterm 2011-01-05 23:14
Hey people, the retail launch is still January 9. It's not OUT yet. It shouldn't really be available at all.

intel didn't rush anything. They've no reason to rush anything. AMD is not competitive in any significant fashion.

Per-core performance doesn't matter? Maybe if you're an AMD fanboy and they're slower, then it doesn't. If you're anyone else, then yes it does.

It's funny to see all these AMD fanboys expecting a big victory. We've seen NOTHING of Bulldozer. Nothing. The first SNB chips are four days away. The big, powerful chips come later in the year. They'll increase the core and thread counts by 50-100%. AMD will be lucky to pull within 10% per core, per clock.
 
 
0 #7 Exodite 2011-01-06 00:29
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Does "per-core" performance still matter?

It very much does.

While many heavy tasks are multi-threaded today it's difficult to share the load equally a lot of the time and that means you're still limited by single-core performance.

Cue gaming, where Intel can offer a significant lead in generally CPU-limited titles.

AMD undoubtedly offer better bang-for-buck for the low end and mid-mainstream but once there more cores doesn't mean much.

The vast majority of us would do better with a 2-4 core with high single-core performance.

Bulldozer might do exceptionally well in the server space however, which is only natural as that's what it's aimed at.
 
 
+4 #8 East17 2011-01-06 04:17
Quoting Naterm:
AMD is not competitive in any significant fashion.



Simply wrong.

1)In the NetBook market Intel's Atom is simply crap and will drop dead in front of Brazos .. I'm not even talking aout Llano.

2)AMD rules in the "under 200$" CPU market. There is NO Intel CPU under 200$ that would bring better value then AMD's solutions . And that's where 80% of the CPU market is .. under 200$.
 
 
-4 #9 Naterm 2011-01-06 04:29
Simply wrong? For one thing, Brazos isn't out yet. So that one is crap right off the bat. Second, netbooks are trending down. AMD is way too late to get significant profits from that segment.

Rules is a huge stretch. They don't rule based on performance, they rule based on intel not wanting to anger regulatory bodies that are already after them. Intel could cut the prices of their low-end processors to gut AMD if they felt they could get way with it without significant regulatory heat. They're giving AMD a break, AMD isn't winning anything.

Think about the big picture next time. AMD is not competitive in any SIGNIFICANT fashion.
 
 
+3 #10 nECrO 2011-01-06 07:03
Quoting Naterm:
Per-core performance doesn't matter? Maybe if you're an AMD fanboy and they're slower, then it doesn't. If you're anyone else, then yes it does.



No. 99% of the buying public is made up of average users who don't know a CPU from a wombat. Their CPU's sit idle 99.99999999999% of their entire lives. To these people a Pentium 4, a Sempron and an I7 seem the same as long as the machine is virus/malware free and operating at it's peak. Only fanboy's geeks, enthusiasts, gamers and power users, who make up 1% of the buying public, care about per-core performance. And I would venture to guess a good many of them aren't taxing their machines either. This goes for Intel or AMD. Keep up the hype. It fuels spending and helps the economy....
 

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