Published in Notebooks

Ancient Babylonian tablet more accurate than Apple’s

by on25 August 2017


The game changer which disappeared from human records

A game changing Ancient Babylonian tablet runs an advanced form of trigonometry which is more accurate than the system used today – it also does not require a battery.

Like most tablets, the Babylonian versions dropped from fashion when people realised that paper or papyrus was slightly more convenient. But the trigonometry tables shown on the tablets are more accurate than any available.

The 3,700-year-old broken clay tablet survives in the collections of Columbia University, and a team from the University of New South Wales in Sydney believe that the four columns and 15 rows of cuneiform – wedge shaped indentations made in the wet clay – represent the world’s oldest and most accurate working trigonometric table, a working tool which could have been used in surveying, and in calculating how to construct temples, palaces and pyramids.

Daniel Mansfield, of the university’s school of mathematics and statistics, described the tablet which may unlock some of their methods as “a fascinating mathematical work that demonstrates undoubted genius” – with potential modern application because the base 60 used in calculations by the Babylonians permitted many more accurate fractions than the contemporary base 10.

Mansfield, who has published his research with his colleague Norman Wildberger in the journal Historia Mathematica, says that while mathematicians understood for decades that the tablet demonstrates that the theorem long predated Pythagoras, there had been no agreement about the intended use of the tablet.

Its research apparently shows that Plimpton 322 describes the shapes of right-angle triangles using a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles. It is a fascinating mathematical work that demonstrates undoubted genius.

“The tablet not only contains the world’s oldest trigonometric table; it is also the only completely accurate trigonometric table, because of the very different Babylonian approach to arithmetic and geometry. This means it has great relevance for our modern world. Babylonian mathematics may have been out of fashion for more than 3,000 years, but it has possible practical applications in surveying, computer graphics and education. This is a rare example of the ancient world teaching us something new.”

 

 

Last modified on 25 August 2017
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