Friday, 20 May 2011 11:04

SSDs last longer

Written by Nick Farell


Intel increases their warranty
One of the criticisms of SSDs is that they are not as reliable in the long term, however that appears to be starting to change.

Intel have announced that it is increasing the warranty on its Intel SSD 320 from three to five years. This would be the first time a consumer SSD has been given a warranty length that matches that of a conventional hard drives. Before now, you could get a lengthy warranties for an SSD but only if you used an enterprise drive which would set you back an arm or a leg.

It seems that Chipzilla is doing its best to get people to shift to SSDs. They have even offered some of their consumer models enterprise-grade features such as power backup capabilities and NAND. But with Intel offering an extended warranty on SSDs it is fairly certain that other suppliers will follow suit.  It will mean that the industry has some confidence that the drives will last the distance.

Now the only thing that seems to seperate the two types of drive is size and the cost. SSDs are still a little pricey particularly when you can get a cheap 2TB conventional drive from a fraction of the cost.
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Comments  

 
+12 #1 Jurassic1024 2011-05-20 11:37
Didn't Patriot Torqx drives have 10 year warranty?
 
 
+51 #2 BernardP 2011-05-20 12:07
"SSDs are still a little pricey" has to be the understatement of the year.
 
 
+13 #3 Ken Fused 2011-05-20 18:12
What I find interesting is that mechanical hard drive capacity is mainly held back by manufacturing ability, where SSD capacity is held back by price. Sooner or later, SSD capacities will exceed amything mechanical. I'm sure it is already techincally possible, but nobody wants to spend $20K on a 8TB SSD.
 
 
+2 #4 Squall_Leonhart 2011-05-21 08:44
Quoting Ken Fused:
What I find interesting is that mechanical hard drive capacity is mainly held back by manufacturing ability, where SSD capacity is held back by price. Sooner or later, SSD capacities will exceed amything mechanical. I'm sure it is already techincally possible, but nobody wants to spend $20K on a 8TB SSD.


well... actually, Flash density itself is a rising concern, Platter density's continue to increase, whilst SSD is about how many flash modules you can stuff on the circuit.
 
 
+4 #5 gozzak 2011-05-22 12:37
Quoting Ken Fused:
What I find interesting is that mechanical hard drive capacity is mainly held back by manufacturing ability, where SSD capacity is held back by price. Sooner or later, SSD capacities will exceed amything mechanical. I'm sure it is already techincally possible, but nobody wants to spend $20K on a 8TB SSD.


The 480GB OCZ vertex 3 is about $2000. Prices have changed very little in the past 2 years, and at this rate, SSDs will not be able to compete with platters for at least a decade.
 
 
0 #6 hoohoo 2011-05-22 17:47
Quoting Squall_Leonhart :
Quoting Ken Fused:
...


well... actually, Flash density itself is a rising concern, Platter density's continue to increase, whilst SSD is about how many flash modules you can stuff on the circuit.


Do you mean on the circuit or in the case? An SSD built in a 3.5" HDD form factor could hold a lot of chips!
 
 
+5 #7 JAB Creations 2011-05-22 20:09
Just stick to a 120-256GB SSD for boot/applications/gaming and to a mechanical drive for mass storage. SSD and mechanical hard drives will both coexist for years and I think even the manufacturers themselves would find it difficult to say either one will dominate the entire industry in ten or twenty years at this point.
 

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