Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 20 August 2007 09:47

BitTorrent ban for Comcast cable modem users

Written by David Stellmack
Image

Comcast uses traffic shaping to catch users

Comcast cable modem Internet users joined those connected to Canadian ISPs Cogeco and Rogers in encountering traffic shaping that is causing Comcast customers to be unable to seed with new peers. Many ISPs in the US and Canada have been experimenting with ways of limiting BitTorrent traffic for over two years now, but this new development of breaking connections with peers is something that is more aggressive than we have seen in the past.

Sources suggest that Comcast is using an IP traffic shaping solution from Sandvine which has but one sole purpose: to throttle available bandwidth for BitTorrent traffic. Many users have already tried a variety of methods to circumvent traffic shaping, but very few solutions really work. Right now, users are being forced to set up BitTorrent over SSH or VPN, as these are currently the only known way to bypass the problem.

Many Comcast users are outraged over this latest development. Complaints to Comcast are falling on deaf ears, as P2P traffic is viewed as the biggest bandwidth waster of the Internet. While we find it hard to believe that ISPs are going to dictate which protocols users can and cannot use over their network, it is obvious that with increased pressure from the RIAA and MPAA, ISPs have to find a solution to try to limit their liability for users that are using their P2P connections to obtain copyrighted material.

The battle will definitely continue and don’t look for the ISPs to start giving ground on limiting traffic any time soon. As a matter of fact, we predict that more ISPs in the U.S. will start using traffic shaping; and one has to wonder what protocol or traffic ISPs will try to limit next to improve their bottom line.

Last modified on Monday, 20 August 2007 13:01

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments