Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 10 March 2009 13:37

We've listened to Xonar Essence STX

Written by Nedim Hadzic
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Image

Impressive 124 SNR

 

While we were checking out Asus' massive booth, we noticed Asus had their Xonar Essence STX audio card on display, and the company is heavily marketing this card for having a 124 dB SNR (signal to noise ratio). The company also claims a frequency response of “<10Hz to 90KHz” but take this with a grain of salt, and we’ll soon tell you why.

The card comes with integrated headphone amplifier capable of driving headphones with up to 600 ohms impedance but note that headphone out has a 117dB SNR. It comes with complete Dolby technologies and DS3D GX2.5 3D gaming engine technology. Additionally, Asus made sure line and headphone outs have independent power and included EMI and Cu shielding, all in order to improve the signal fidelity.

While we won’t argue whether the card actually can reproduce 10Hz or 90KHz, we can’t help but ask ourselves why even go for such figures. Humans hear from 20Hz to 20KHz (in ideal conditions), and anything below 35Hz (in best case scenario) is more felt than heard, and anything over 20KHz is useless, as humans can’t  hear above that threshold, and it gets worse with age. Additionally, pumping out 10Hz would require some serious air to be pushed, and you’d need way more than just this card to pull off such a feat.

That being said, the card does sound nice, but we’ll reserve our final judgment until we’ve actually had a chance to take it out for a spin. Until then, you can check out the pictures we’ve taken at the booth.

Image
Oh and we think the correct spelling is iMpedance.

Image



Last modified on Wednesday, 11 March 2009 12:24
Nedim Hadzic

Nedim Hadzic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments