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Wednesday, 01 August 2007 10:10

Transparent nanotube-based thin film arrives

Written by David Stellmack
Image

Cheaper than carbon nanotubes

Unidym Inc.
has produced a transparent nanotube-based thin film using low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques in comparison to the labor intensive vacuum chamber process required for ITO electrodes used in flat-panel displays and touch screens, LCDs and solar panels that promise lower costs for use in the electronics industry.

Unidym is also involved the development of carbon-based electrodes for fuel cells. Unidym, Inc. recently merged with Carbon Nanotechnologies Inc., and the merger has resulted in hundreds of nanotube patents now available to Unidym.

The nanotube-based thin films offer widespread use for consumer electronic touch-screen products, since they offer extremely strong and durable product properties with the transparency of indium-based film.
The transparent electronics market is about a $1 billion market currently. Unidym currently manufactures nanotubes in Houston, Texas by a black powder process of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes. It then produces films by mixing a solution of the black powder with water at room temperature and sprays the compound onto a glass or plastic roll.

Read more here...

Last modified on Wednesday, 01 August 2007 10:38

David Stellmack

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