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Friday, 06 June 2008 19:15

Cooler Master does dual Quad-SLI on 1100W

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Computex 08: Two systems, one PSU

Cooler Master had a demo up and running of two systems powered by a single power supply; and in all fairness, Foxconn had one of four systems powered by one power supply, but the difference between the two is that Cooler Master had a two quad-SLI system.

Both setups were looping 3DMark06 and seemed to be running just fine using a single 1100W UWP PSU, which isn't a bad feat in itself. What makes it even more interesting is that both setups were using quad-core Intel Q9450 processors, Asus Striker II Formula motherboards, a Raptor hard drive and 2GB of memory.

The demo was to highlight how good Cooler Master's new range of UWP power supplies is, but it also shows that you need a far less powerful power supply than what you think. Nvidia and AMD are saying you need all sorts of high-end power supplies to make their graphics cards run, but it's actually more important to get a quality PSU.

Now we're waiting for someone to power 10 mini-ITX 2.0 boards with a Geforce 9800 GX2 in them from a single PSU, but that might have to wait until the next show.

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Last modified on Friday, 06 June 2008 19:48
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