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Monday, 14 June 2010 11:35

New York Times bans ?tweeting?

Written by Nick Farell
ImageImage

A term not approved by Apple


Steve Jobs'
unpaid press office the New York Times has decided that its hacks are not allowed to use the word “tweeting” in their news stories. Despite the fact that tweets are fast becoming a good source of getting comments to the great unwashed, the New York Times thinks that the word is not proper English.

Although since it is an American newspaper and they have not spoken proper English since the 17th century this seems a little strange to us. Phil Corbett, standards editor at The New York Times has sent out notice saying that ‘tweet' is one of those words that "has not yet achieved the status of standard English. And standard English is what we should use in news articles."

Corbett is trying to prevent his publication from alienating readers by avoiding "colloquialisms, neologisms and jargon." However this is the outfit that believes it is acceptable to spell the Internet with a capital "i" but insists that iPad should be spelt as Steve Jobs tells it.


Last modified on Sunday, 20 June 2010 17:29

Nick Farell

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