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Thursday, 03 June 2010 13:27

Acer CEO weighs in on Foxconn suicides

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Lanci "seriously concerned"


Acer CEO Gianfranco Lanci has weighed on in the recent spate of suicides at Foxconn plants, which produce much of Acer's products.

He noted that Acer was seriously concerned about the issue and that it was looking into ways of improving the quality of living for the workers. Lanci stressed that migrant workers comprised much of the workforce and that it might be a better idea to build massive plants in big population centers, eliminating the need for young people to leave their homes and familiar surroundings to find work. He noted that Acer had no plans to transfer its production from China to Indonesia or Vietnam, due to supply issues.

Commenting the recent depreciation of the euro and strict austerity measures introduced by several EU countries, Lanci said that they would probably not affect demand for PCs, although prices are going up due to the euro's weakness.

"A PC today is really a commodity," said Lanci. "300 to 400 euro is one week's salary for the people in Europe. It's not a big investment as it was three, four or five years ago."

To put it simply, people can't afford not to buy PCs nowadays, regardless of the economic situation. They have already become a necessity, like bread, milk and cereal.

More here.

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