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Tuesday, 23 February 2010 12:28

US now blames someone else for Google hacks

Written by Nick Farell


Image

He still has government links


Desperate to
prove that the flaccid attack on Google was a communist plot, the US government has pointed the finger at another person “with Chinese government links”.

Last week the defence industry claimed that two Chinese schools with links to the Chinese military were responsible. Later it turned out that one of the schools provides hairdressers and wielders for the military and no technology experts.

Now US government analysts have pointed the finger at a Chinese man who wrote a large chunk of the code for a bit of malware which was similar to the Google hack. The US trotted out the same claims hints that he had 'links to the Chinese military” but fortunately in this case no one can pop around and see how silly the story is. The man, a security consultant in his 30s, posted sections of the programme to a hacking forum where he described it as something he was "working on," the paper said.

The spyware creator works as a freelancer and did not launch the attack, but Chinese officials had "special access" to his programming, the report said. The report did not say how the US knew about the man's government ties. However the US seems now desperate to get the world to believe that the Chinese are engaged in cyber warfare against the Land of the Free.  This is mostly because defence contractors are spending a fortune trying to land cyber protection contracts and need to invent an enemy to convince the government to give them funds.
Last modified on Tuesday, 23 February 2010 14:32

Nick Farell

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