Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 21 December 2009 11:51

Germans get RFID ID cards next year

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Precise information for hackers


Despite security concerns, the Interior Ministry of Germany will introduce radio-frequency (RFID) chip identification cards on November 1, 2010 that will contain a lot of personal information, fingerprint and a pin number.

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere in a statement that the new card will be smaller than the old one but can do a lot more. On November 1, 2010, German citizens will be introduced to new identification cards that contain RFID chips, which will digitally store personal information.

The move has got privacy groups a little upset because not only is there no need for an RFID chip they are also a little easy to read. The RFID chip, which can be detected two meters away without the person's knowledge, unlike passports, ID cards are expected to be carried by Germans at all times.

Head of the privacy and data security group at Technische Universitat Dresden, Dr. Andreas Pfitzmann, warned that the way the system has been set up, the cards could be used in a terrorist attack. He claimed he could use this frequency to set off a bomb where I know there are only Americans or Germans.



Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments