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Wednesday, 18 July 2007 07:37

27,000 users affected in Kingston breach

Written by David Stellmack
Image

Pants down in long-running security breach


Kingston Technology
Company Inc. has begun notifying affected customers of a security breach dating back to September 2005 that remained undetected until just recently. 

Kingston indicated that the breach may have provided unauthorized access to nearly 27,000 online Kingston customers’ names, addresses and credit card information. Kingston's IT team began an investigation after it detected irregularities in the company computer systems, and then engaged a team of computer forensic experts to perform a more extensive probe.

The company did not offer details as to why it took so long for the breach to be discovered, or how long it waited to begin a formal investigation.

Kingston did indicate that it does not believe any data that was illegally accessed has been misused.  If it took Kingston nearly 2 years to discover the security breach one can only wonder how they can be so easily and quickly assured that there has been no misuse of the accessed data. 
Last modified on Wednesday, 18 July 2007 09:57

David Stellmack

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