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Thursday, 05 November 2009 06:20

Beware of buying used Xbox 360s

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Banned consoles can't connect to Xbox Live

As we reported recently, Microsoft has been lowering the boom on modified Xbox 360 consoles in an effort to combat piracy. One thing that seems to have been forgotten is that once an Xbox 360 is banned, the console remains banned and is unable to connect to Xbox Live.

The reminder about the purchase of used Xbox 360 consoles was delivered by none other than Larry “Major Nelson” Hryb from Microsoft. The spin that he has put on the situation is very logical in the sense that it is all for the sake of the community and to protect those that are playing by the rules. The bottom line is that according to Hryb, the video game business depends on customers paying for genuine products and services that they get from manufacturers, retailers and third party companies that support them.

The reminder will likely send a shock wave through the used Xbox 360 market in general, and could lead stores that deal in used Xbox 360 consoles to be much more careful in accepting consoles for trade or purchase. If you choose to purchase a used Xbox 360 console, you had better make sure that you understand the warranty the console comes with from the retailer and what the time period for returns is in the event that a return is required should the console turn out to be banned.

Microsoft Xbox 360 consoles do not have a transferable warranty; and if it has been banned and you buy the console the company is not going to lift a finger to help you, or “unban” it so it can connect to Xbox Live. The situation does seem to be getting a lot of discussion in various places, and to be honest, we don’t know what all of the fuss is about. If you take the risk in buying a used console rather than a new console, then you are on your own to deal with the retailer to work out any problems. We recommend that you ask questions and make your purchasing decision carefully.

You can read more here.

Last modified on Thursday, 05 November 2009 10:10

David Stellmack

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