Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 18 September 2009 12:23

Apple should face the music

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Pay for our adverts says entertainment biz


Greedy
songwriters, composers, and music publishers are leaning on politicians to make Apple and and other digital duke boxes pay for the 30 second clips that they provide for advertising.

The groups say that their work is still downloaded and someone should pay them. They want Apple to pay licensing fees to ASCAP and BMI for the downloads of TV shows and films it sells and for the partial downloads which are usually used for advertising. If the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), Broadcast Music (BMI), and other performing-rights groups gets its way there will be more price hikes for online music.

Apparently when the groups had no joy trying to screw more money out of digital content providers they decided to call up their friends in Washington. Part of the problem is that the movie studios, big recording companies, TV networks, and online retailers who have beaten a similar path before have succeeded in bleeding the industry dry and left nothing for those who actually produce the music.

President of the Songwriters' Guild of America Rick Carnes in theory he made 9.1 cents off a song sale and that means a whole lot of pennies have to add up before it becomes a bunch of money. "People think we're making a fortune off the Web, but it's a tiny amount. We need multiple revenue streams or this isn't going to work."

While we are sympathetic to the musicians and songwriters, the idea of paying yet another body loads of cash for a single is getting a bit daft and if these guys can't sort themselves out and work together collectively without one ripping the other off then we don't see why the consumer should pay. It it is like buying a car and the bloke who sells you the engine wants to charge you extra while the guy who makes the wheels sends you a bill for extra cash.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments