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Thursday, 17 September 2009 11:16

Twitter gets voice

Written by Nick Farell

Image

All we need


Twitter users
will be able to make voice calls directly to each other. Third-party software from Jajah known as Jajah@call is expected to go into beta Thursday morning. It allows Twitter users to start a two-way voice chat with other users by typing "@call @username"--where "username" is someone's Twitter ID--into any Twitter client.

While the product is being tested the company said, the calls will be limited to two minutes, but the company will evaluate that length during beta. However, it sees the two minute period--after which the call will end--as "the verbal equivalent of a tweet."  We would call it fairly useless but we are sure that anyone who can condense their life into a tweet will probably not have a problem with this.

Jajah is an ISP and the service will allow a user to place a call to any other user, so long as the second person follows the first on Twitter and both have Jajah accounts. The service is free to use and is expected to work on any Twitter-enabled device, from PCs to smart phones. Users can keep their phone numbers private and yet have voice chats with just about anyone on Twitter. Since the calls are initiated by one person, the recipient may well not be online, or may choose to ignore the call if they don't want to talk.

Why do we have a bad feeling about this?

Nick Farell

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