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Tuesday, 18 August 2009 11:50

Man charged in biggest card theft case ever

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130 million card numbers


The U.S. Justice Department has indicted 28-year-old Miami resident Albert Gonzales of masterminding the biggest credit card number heist in history.

Gonzales is accused of stealing more than 130 million credit and debit card numbers from 2006 to 2008. He did not act alone, and two unidentified conspirators from Russia were also involved. It is still unclear how many of the card numbers were sold online, and if all the cards' owners were informed of the theft.

This is not the first time Gonzales had a run in with the law. In 2005 he was charged with other credit card thefts, including a breach at T.J. Maxx stores. He is also awaiting trial in New York for a separate attack.

Oddly enough, at one point in 2003 Gonzales was working with federal authorities to help find his former conspirators, but he eventually reverted to crime. According to some reports, his life of crime was working out rather well, and one one occasion Gonzales spent $75,000 for a birthday bash in Miami. He complained that he had to count thousands of $20 bills when his counting machine broke.

He is facing up to 35 years in prison and more than $1 million in fines, so you could say he will pay for his deed, with interest. His Russian co-conspirators could face a similar fate, provided they are ever identified.

More here.

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