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Wednesday, 20 June 2007 11:27

Wireless USB is still slow

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Image

Live demo


We had a chance to witness a live demostration of Wireless USB and we have to tell you that it works fine, but not as fast as you would expect. A company called Displaylink already has a chip that supports wireless USB and Vista and it can even transmit a monitor signal over the air from a PC to a Display, and use a wireless keyboard and mouse at the same time. 


In the specifications, Wireless USB 2.0 supports up to 480 Megabits per second, but in real life even the wired products fails to meet that. Wireless USB is even slower and can reach about 30 to 40 Mbits per second. This will be fast enough for a 2D non video USB display signal, but not enough for HD video.

The wireless USB chips are still in dipers, so we can not blame them for being so slow. Sometimes the marketeers should wake up and face the real world and stop telling us about best case scenario numbers.

We expect to see a bunch of these devices in 2008 and a few this year.

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 June 2007 12:18

Fuad Abazovic

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