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Wednesday, 11 February 2009 11:53

Californian finds treasure ship using Google Earth

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Texan beach shines in silver and gold?

 

A Californian man claims he has found the lost treasure from a Spanish ship which ran aground in Texas using nothing but Google Earth.

Nathan Smith, a musician from LA says he found some odd coastal features near the area where the ship is reported to have run ashore in 1822. He has visited the site with a metal detector, and claims it's the real McCoy. He believes that the site could hold as much as 3 billion dollars worth of gold and silver.

Of course, there's a twist. The coastline is part of a ranch, and as you can imagine, the owners aren't too pleased with the prospect of a dude from California digging up their precious seaside property.

Attorney Ron Walker, representing the ranch owners, says Smith's claim is unfounded. He says it's absolutely preposterous that someone could find treasure buried for centuries using just Google Earth. He claims Smith has no proof of anything and no experience in the field.

We hope he's wrong, as even the ranch owners probably won't mind a cut of the 3 billion Smith expects to find, and being a Californian musician, Smith could probably use the cash.

More here.

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