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Wednesday, 31 December 2008 12:46

Wall Street Journal pours cold water on Dell's green claims

Written by Nick Farell

Image

What exactly is carbon neutral


The
Wall Street Journal has been taking the mickey out of Dell's claims to be carbon neutral.

Dell has been touting its green credentials for some time and is now claiming to be 'carbon neutral' , however as the WSJ points out that claim could mean anything.

This is partly because there is no standard definition of carbon neutral. Companies can buy carbon credits and this market isn't regulated and is also in flux. The vendor does not count emissions from suppliers in its footprint, so those factories in China belting out smoke don't count.

According to the WSJ, Dell counts the emissions produced by its boilers and company-owned cars, its buildings' electricity use, and its employees' business air travel.

However Dell does not count all the oil used by Dell's suppliers to make its computer parts, the diesel and jet fuel used to ship those computers around the world, or the coal-fired electricity used to run them.

More here.


Nick Farell

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