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Friday, 12 December 2008 11:40

Intel, Ericsson team up on anti-theft technology

Written by Nick Farell

Image

All your notebooks should belong to you


Intel and Ericsson have hatched out a cunning plan to build anti-theft technology for laptops.

The pair are developing a system called Intel Anti-Theft PC Protection Technology. The technology promises to provide reliable anti-theft technology for notebooks equipped with mobile broadband. The pair have shared technology that helps the person or authorities find the notebook when lost or stolen while preventing system access.

Notebook owners can send a message via SMS text message to the mobile broadband equipped notebook to lock the computer and render it unusable. This is similar to a system introduced by Lenovo where a text message to a mobile broadband equipped notebook would lock it down, preventing use by unauthorized persons.

However, Intel and Ericsson's plan uses GPS to help coppers find the lost computer. The technology also allows for automatic theft reporting if the notebook moves outside a pre-defined area. Once the loss or theft of the notebook is detected, the theft protection system bricks the computer and deletes the keys needed to decrypt encrypted files.
Last modified on Saturday, 13 December 2008 02:42

Nick Farell

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