Featured Articles

IDC says PC market is rebounding

IDC says PC market is rebounding

Research firm IDC has published its latest report into the state of the PC market and while there are some signs…

More...
TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC steps up development of 10nm process

TSMC, the world’s biggest chip foundry for hire, has reportedly stepped up development of its 10nm manufacturing process.

More...
Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

Broadwell 14nm desktop comes late in Q2 2015

A while ago we mentioned that Broadwell won’t show up in the desktop space this year and we got it right.…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

EVGA GTX 780 Classified reviewed

The EVGA GTX 780 Classified has been dethroned as the company’s fastest non-Titan card following the introduction of the GTX 780…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 12 December 2008 11:40

Intel, Ericsson team up on anti-theft technology

Written by Nick Farell

Image

All your notebooks should belong to you


Intel and Ericsson have hatched out a cunning plan to build anti-theft technology for laptops.

The pair are developing a system called Intel Anti-Theft PC Protection Technology. The technology promises to provide reliable anti-theft technology for notebooks equipped with mobile broadband. The pair have shared technology that helps the person or authorities find the notebook when lost or stolen while preventing system access.

Notebook owners can send a message via SMS text message to the mobile broadband equipped notebook to lock the computer and render it unusable. This is similar to a system introduced by Lenovo where a text message to a mobile broadband equipped notebook would lock it down, preventing use by unauthorized persons.

However, Intel and Ericsson's plan uses GPS to help coppers find the lost computer. The technology also allows for automatic theft reporting if the notebook moves outside a pre-defined area. Once the loss or theft of the notebook is detected, the theft protection system bricks the computer and deletes the keys needed to decrypt encrypted files.
Last modified on Saturday, 13 December 2008 02:42

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments