Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 12 December 2008 06:56

AT&T, T-Mobile can't claim hack proof phones

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Permanent injunctions filed and agreed on

Both AT&T Inc. and T-Mobile cellphone providers have agreed to permanent injunctions against their earlier advertising claims that their voice mail systems were safe from sabotage. Both cell phone providers falsely advertised the security of their systems, according to the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office.

During an investigation, "cell phones purchased by undercover investigators were easily hacked into, enabling the voice mail to be changed at will. Hacking into voice mail allowed messages to be changed or erased. Important information could be removed from the voice mail and phony information could be inserted," said the District Attorney. "Imagine the havoc that could result."

Investigators used a SpoofCard and were able to hack into voice mail accounts.  The SpoofCard has software that allows people to display any telephone number they want on Caller ID. It has been used to hack into voice mail systems that do not have mandatory passwords. AT&T agreed to pay $59,300 in penalties and T-Mobile will pay $25,000 as part of the settlement.
Last modified on Friday, 12 December 2008 08:12

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments