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Friday, 12 December 2008 06:56

AT&T, T-Mobile can't claim hack proof phones

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Permanent injunctions filed and agreed on

Both AT&T Inc. and T-Mobile cellphone providers have agreed to permanent injunctions against their earlier advertising claims that their voice mail systems were safe from sabotage. Both cell phone providers falsely advertised the security of their systems, according to the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office.

During an investigation, "cell phones purchased by undercover investigators were easily hacked into, enabling the voice mail to be changed at will. Hacking into voice mail allowed messages to be changed or erased. Important information could be removed from the voice mail and phony information could be inserted," said the District Attorney. "Imagine the havoc that could result."

Investigators used a SpoofCard and were able to hack into voice mail accounts.  The SpoofCard has software that allows people to display any telephone number they want on Caller ID. It has been used to hack into voice mail systems that do not have mandatory passwords. AT&T agreed to pay $59,300 in penalties and T-Mobile will pay $25,000 as part of the settlement.
Last modified on Friday, 12 December 2008 08:12

David Stellmack

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