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Tuesday, 09 December 2008 11:36

Telstra exposed

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Users miffed


Aussie Telco Telstra has been accused of having shonky technical standards with thousands of punters putting up with crude, temporary phone connections with cables held together by tape and plastic bags and strung along fences, across lawns and through trees.

Some cables are left in place for months and even years, despite repeated pleas to finish the job by burying them. User complaints are met by Telstra, telling them they have more important things to do and many think that their temporary lines are going to be permanent.

Telstra Group's managing director for networks and services, Michael Rocca, was unwilling to say exactly how many temporary cables were in place around the country.  He said that the percentage of dodgy temporary cables was small, although 12,000 people are probably suffering.

However, Steve Dodd, the NSW branch assistant secretary of the Communications Plumbing and Electrical Union, claimed was caused because Telstra made most of its  "conduit workers" redundant and none of the technicians who are left have a shovel.

More here.
Last modified on Wednesday, 10 December 2008 04:14

Nick Farell

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