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Thursday, 31 May 2007 11:15

Top spammer arrested

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Spam will drop claim feds


The FBI claims that its arrest of a Seattle man who it described as top spammer should lead to an immediate drop in the amount of unsolicited emails.

Robert Alan Soloway, 27, was named as one of the Top 10 spammers in the World, by Microsoft.
He faces a  35-count indictment charging him with mail fraud, wire fraud, e-mail fraud, aggravated identity theft and money laundering.

He's accused of using networks of compromised computers to send out millions upon millions of junk e-mails since 2003.

Microsoft won a $7 million civil judgement against him in 2005 and Robert Brauer, the operator of a small Internet service provider in western Oklahoma, won a $10 million judgement, but he carried on operating.

US Attorney Jeff Sullivan said Wednesday the case is the first in the country in which federal prosecutors have used identity theft statutes to prosecute a spammer for taking over someone else's Internet domain name, and it would mean at least an extra two years on Soloway's sentence if he is convicted.

He could go inside for decades. Soloway pleaded not guilty to all charges.

More here.


Last modified on Thursday, 31 May 2007 17:12

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