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Monday, 20 October 2008 10:23

Big software will be killed by global slowdown

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Salespush boss warns


Salespush CEO
Mark Donkin has looked into his crystal ball and predicted that the global economic slowdown will mean the end of complex and expensive corporate software.

Writing on the company’s News Forum, Donkin said large software companies have made a good living over the past 20 years selling ever more complicated software products, for ever more inflated prices. After looking at this tarot cards, Donkin said that this trend has now peaked and will go into reverse.

He claims that one of the signs and portents that prove his theory include the dramatic fall in the share price of some of the leading players. Donkin said this is evidence that companies are turning away from overly engineered systems weighted down by functionality that is often unused by the majority of employees.

Businesses are under pressure to innovate as never before and  must respond instantly to changes in their market places, he said. Many large company packages are not poor products per se, but they are too unwieldy and complex for most organizations to use properly, he said.

More here.
Last modified on Tuesday, 21 October 2008 05:12

Nick Farell

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