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Thursday, 25 September 2008 14:13

Email backlash starting

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Mixed feelings about 24/7 connections

 

Research company Pew Internet and American Life Project said that workers were having mixed feelings about the increased use of e-mail and the Internet in the last few years. In a survey of 2,134 adults in March and April, 96 percent used e-mail, the Internet or cell phones. Of them, 80 percent said these technologies have improved their ability to do their jobs, and 58 percent said these tools have given them more control over when to work.

However, just under half of them were miffed that these devices mean they end up working much longer hours. More than 49 percent said that the technologies make it harder to disconnect from work. Half of the respondents who were employed and had e-mail said they check their work e-mail on weekends.

More than  22 percent said they checked office e-mail "often" on the weekends, up from 16 percent who said the same thing in 2002. If you earn more than $75,000 a year, you are more likely to want to check your email. Those who work for large corporations are much more likely to be checking
their e-mail "constantly" at work.

Last modified on Friday, 26 September 2008 03:47

Nick Farell

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