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Thursday, 18 September 2008 06:24

Patent infringement claims against Nintendo

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Claims against Wii controller

Hillcrest Laboratories has alleged that Nintendo Company Ltd. is infringing on four of Hillcrest’s patents with the Wii video game, and brought its claim before the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC).

The ITC has the authority to bar products that are made with infringed technology from the U.S., which was Hillcrest’s reason for filing with the ITC. The ITC agreed on Wednesday to look into the allegations made by Hillcrest Laboratories.

Hillcrest is alleging that Nintendo is infringing four of Hillcrest’s patents to make the top-selling Wii game console. Hillcrest, based in Rockville, Maryland has created motion-detecting technology which allows users to select items on a screen by waving a handheld device. The Wii relies on a motion-sensing controller that lets users direct on-screen play by moving it around, as with a baseball bat or a tennis racket.

The Wii console has been hugely popular since its introduction in 2006. Hillcrest said that other leading consumer electronics companies also use its technology, but they have paid licensing fees to do so.

Last modified on Thursday, 18 September 2008 08:23

David Stellmack

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