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Thursday, 28 August 2008 14:10

Taiwan's former Presidents' details leaked

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Six people arrested


Coppers
in Taiwan have arrested six people suspected of nicking personal data from state firms, including information about the island's presidents.

Taiwan's Criminal Investigation Bureau said government agencies, state-run firms, telecom companies and a television shopping network had been hacked to get the data. He claimed it was the biggest hacking operation in Taiwan's history.

The six are believed to have stolen more than 50 million records of personal data, including information about President Ma Ying-jeou, his predecessor, Chen Shui-bian, and police chief, Wang Cho-chiun. They were peddling it for $10 an entry through the Taiwanese underworld.

The hackers, based in Taiwan and China, were also involved in a cunning plan to con victims out of millions of Taiwan U.S. dollars through their online bank accounts.

If they are convicted, they will face up to five years in prison.
Last modified on Friday, 29 August 2008 04:45

Nick Farell

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