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Thursday, 14 August 2008 13:38

Kids less interested in illegal downloads

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Prefer going legit instead

 

Kids of today are slowly losing interest in illegal music downloads, according to analyst outfit NPD Group. In a report, with the catchy title, Kids & Digital Content, NPD revealed 70 percent of those aged between nine and 14 are downloading digital music in an average month.

While this is enough to get the RIAA bribing its U.S. politicians to create laws to put all children into slave camps, the figures have some things that are good news for the music mafia. This is that a lot of the music sharing is actually legitimate.

iTunes is the most popular digital music store and is used by half of them. But illegal peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing site, Limewire, is the next most popular and that is used by only 26% of kids. In fact, the report showed that the percentage of U.S. Internet users who engage in P2P file sharing reached a plateau of 19 percent last year. In other words, while most teens had illegally downloaded a file or two, their method of choice is still legal.

Of course, the RIAA will be quoting the 80 percent figure for the next 40 years as proof that schools should be shut down and children confiscated to protect their copyrights.

Last modified on Friday, 15 August 2008 02:55

Nick Farell

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