Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 14 August 2008 13:38

Kids less interested in illegal downloads

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Prefer going legit instead

 

Kids of today are slowly losing interest in illegal music downloads, according to analyst outfit NPD Group. In a report, with the catchy title, Kids & Digital Content, NPD revealed 70 percent of those aged between nine and 14 are downloading digital music in an average month.

While this is enough to get the RIAA bribing its U.S. politicians to create laws to put all children into slave camps, the figures have some things that are good news for the music mafia. This is that a lot of the music sharing is actually legitimate.

iTunes is the most popular digital music store and is used by half of them. But illegal peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing site, Limewire, is the next most popular and that is used by only 26% of kids. In fact, the report showed that the percentage of U.S. Internet users who engage in P2P file sharing reached a plateau of 19 percent last year. In other words, while most teens had illegally downloaded a file or two, their method of choice is still legal.

Of course, the RIAA will be quoting the 80 percent figure for the next 40 years as proof that schools should be shut down and children confiscated to protect their copyrights.

Last modified on Friday, 15 August 2008 02:55

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments