Featured Articles

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

Apple is dancing the same dance year after year. It releases the iPhone and two days before they start shipping it…

More...
Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon has just released three new tablets starting with the $99 priced 6-inch Kindle Fire HD6. This is a 6-inch tablet…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 08 August 2008 07:42

Scientists develop rubbery materials that conduct electricity

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Mold for artificial eye implant


In a breakthrough in the development of electronics, scientists at the University of Tokyo in Japan have reported that they have developed a rubbery material that conducts electricity. This is a key characteristic in making electronic devices that bend and stretch.

Scientist Tsuyoshi Sekitani reported that the material was developed using carbon nanotubes, long carbon molecules that are capable of conducting electricity. Next, a rubbery polymer was added to form the base material and then a grid of tiny transistors was attached to the material. When the materials were tested it was stretched to almost twice its original size and then released. It snapped back into place and did not affect the transistors or destroy the conductive properties of the materials.  Sekitani said that the material could be used on curved surfaces or even in moving parts, such as the joints of a robotic arm.

Additionally, a U.S. research team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reported that it has developed an elastic mesh material from standard electronics materials to construct an electronic eye camera that resembles the human eye. This device could be used as a model for the development of an artificial eye implant. (Finally I can take my patch off and pillage in full 3D. Yarr! Turn to port laddies! sub.ed.)
Last modified on Friday, 08 August 2008 10:03

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments