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Thursday, 04 September 2014 11:02

Oracle has Oregon by the short and curlies

Written by Nick Farrell

Needs to sue, needs its help

Oregon, which is suing Oracle for making such a pig’s ear of its ObamaCare site still needs the data-base maker’s help to make the thing work.

Although the pair are involved in a nasty court case, Oregon officials still need Oracle's cooperation to meet a looming deadline related to the state's troubled health-insurance exchange website.

The state hired Oracle to help it build the website, Cover Oregon, as part of the government's health-care overhaul. Cover Oregon suffered major performance problems upon its go-live date in October, never worked.

Deloitte, the contractor hired to handle the Medicaid site work warned of a "critical issue" involving Oracle Managed Cloud Services, the vendor's hosting operation.  In a report into the affair it said that it is unknown whether OMCS will be able to provision an additional production environment by Friday to support the November 2014 implementation.

If the system is not ready by then, state officials may have to resort to the expensive manual enrolment processes they used after Cover Oregon's failed launch.

Oracle wants the state to pay more than $20 million in fees it says it's still owed, while Oregon claims that Oracle's shoddy work on the project cost it hundreds of millions of dollars.

Oregon claims that Oracle conducted a behind-the-scenes scheme to ensure the state did not hire an independent systems integrator in order to collect additional consulting fees.

 

Nick Farrell

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