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Monday, 01 September 2014 15:00

Apple can’t be hacked

Written by Nick Farrell

Tame Apple Press rallies to Apple’s defence

After naked photos of around 20 celebrities, including Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Ariana and more have leaked online over the weekend the Tame Apple Press rushed, without a shred of evidence, to defend Apple’s iCloud.

The thread was posted in 4chan thread and everyone there seemed to think that he had hacked Apple’s iCloud service.

However Business Insider rushed to the aid of Apple declaring bluntly that such a hack was completely impossible because Apple’s cloud was encrypted.

Instead it insisted that the hacker tricked the 20 celebrities into handing over their saucy shots.

“This exploit works by learning which online services your target uses, and then compiling as much data on them as possible before using that data to either spoof access, or to simply use their email address and a guessed password to log in to their account,” said Business Insider.

“After discovering the iCloud account of a celebrity, it's trivially easy to access their online photo backup through Apple's Photo Stream utility and iCloud photo backups. Analysis of the embedded EXIF data (information about where and how the picture was taken that is frequently appended to digital photo images) included in one of the leaked images shows it was taken a few weeks ago, well within Photo Stream's limit of 30 days before images are deleted,” Business Insider informs us.

However Business Insider admits that its theory does not hold water because one of those hacked moaned that the pictures were taken "years ago" which precludes that particular attack vector.

Given that cloud services have been hacked before, and Apple’s record on security is not exactly 100 per cent, may be, just may be, a team of hackers has worked their way into cracking the iCloud.

 

 

Nick Farrell

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