Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 10 July 2014 09:00

Android factory reset doesn’t work as advertised

Written by Fudzilla staff



Overwrite everything

The factory reset function in Android is supposed to be a practical and quick way of wiping an Android device once users decide to sell it or pass it on, but according to Avast’s research it is not bulletproof. 

Avast researchers purchased 20 used Android phone on eBay and started tinkering with them in an effort to restore the wiped information. Avast says the process involved “simple and easily available” software, which means it well within the reach of mere mortals who do not have the same resources as a security outfit.

Eventually Avast managed to recover more than 40,000 stored photos, including 1,500 family photos of children, more than 750 photos of women in “various stages of undress” and more than 250 photos of the previous owners’ manhood. Avast describes the latter as ‘selfies’ and this raises additional questions, mostly those involving personal hygiene rather than tech.

However, it is not as bad as it sounds. Avast managed to establish the identity of four previous owners. It also got 250 contact names and email addresses and one completed loan application. It seems the really important stuff is a lot more secure than photos.

There is no word on mobile banking apps or digital wallets, but since they are not mentioned in the report, it is safe to assume they were not compromised.

Avast says the only way of completely deleting all data from your Android device prior to selling it is to overwrite everything. Coincidentally Avast has an app that does it for you, which explains why it bothered looking at all those used phones and manhood selfies in the first place.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments