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Wednesday, 09 July 2014 10:01

Another hole in Flash

Written by Nick Farrell

It cannot save anyone of us

Another critical security flaw has been found for Adobe's Flash plug-in. Google Engineer Michele Spagnuolo has written an exploit tool, called "Rosetta Flash" which allows hackers to steal your cookies and other data using malicious Flash .SWF files.

The flaw has been known about since Adam was a boy, had been left unfixed until now as nobody had found a way to harness it for evil. Twitter, Microsoft, Google and Instagram have already patched their sites, but beware of others that may still be vulnerable.

Adobe now has a fix, and if you use Chrome or Internet Explorer 10 or 11, your browser should automatically update soon with the latest versions of Flash, 14.0.0.145. However, if you have a browser like Firefox, you may want to grab the latest Flash version from Adobe directly. Just be careful, that Adobe does not stuff up your computer with its god awful McAfee plug-in.

Apps like Tweetdeck or Pandora will need to update Adobe AIR -- that should happen automatically.

Nick Farrell

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