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Monday, 02 June 2014 07:55

Nvidia wins Computex awards for Tegra K1, GRID

Written by Fudzilla staff



Now if it could only sell a Tegra or two...

Nvidia has scooped up a couple of Computex tradeshow awards in Old Taipei. Sadly though, Nvidia does not have much in the way of new products to show off at the show, but it could surprise us with a device or two.

The Best Choice award went to Nvidia GRID, a truly innovative technology enabled on Kepler generation products. GRID can be used for a wide variety of compute applications, enabling GPU virtualisation, low-latency remote displays and basically it promises to deliver a full PC experience to just about any device with a good internet connection. GRID is also behind Nvidia’s Gaming as a Service (GaaS) push.

The Tegra K1 won the Golden Award. The SoC boasts a powerful 192-core GPU that can be used for applications other than Candy Crush. It is fully programmable and developers can use the CUDA cores for some exotic stuff, too. 

Unfortunately the K1 does not have that many design wins in the consumer space so far, but we’re starting to see the first devices based on the new SoC. The TK1 will end up in a couple of Nvidia-branded products, including the second gen Shield console and a tablet.

Fudzilla staff

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