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Thursday, 22 May 2014 09:57

LG will dumb down your smart TV

Written by Nick Farrell

You will have to agree to its privacy policy

A user of an LG smart TV said that the company dumbed down his smart TV after he refused to sign up to the company’s privacy policy. Consumerist magazine said it is investigating a case where LG restricted access to TV’s network based programs: [BBC] iPlayer, Skype, 3D because he refused to agree to its privacy policy.

Apparently he actually read the privacy document, which no one ever does, and did not like what he saw.

“I was not best pleased with the company’s assumption that I would simply agree to their sharing all our intimate viewing details (plus what ever else they can see) with all and sundry,” the LG television owner noted.

But when he told the TV that he didn’t agree with the privacy policy, LG turned the telly into something as retarded as a National Front voter who has had a lobotomy.

It is an interesting point which is waiting to be contested by law. The bloke would have bought a smart TV with the expectation that he could look at web telly. He would have paid extra for the service. So can a company “change the goalposts at will,” and yank features if users don’t agree to new terms and conditions.

Consumerist is sure that British users have a case. Meanwhile it is probably not a good idea to buy an LG telly if it is prepared to brick some of the functions if you do not want to share your viewing habits with anyone it likes.

Nick Farrell

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