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Friday, 16 May 2014 11:40

Penn close to creating brain like computers

Written by Nick Farrell



Will need to run on coffee

Penn State researchers have created a new kind of computer chip that could be the key to creating brain-like computers that can solve incredibly complex problems while consuming just a per cent of the power of current chips. Apparently, the chips contain what the boffins call “wacky oxide” which oscillates at certain frequency, and synchronizes with other nearby wacky chips. This works in much in the same way that nearby neurons often fire in synchrony. 

The research is based on the idea that if you have multiple sets of oscillating elements. Each area would oscillate in a certain way, depending on the data that it stored. If another area then stored the same or similar data, then it would begin to synchronize with the other area — and the degree of synchronization can be read.

The chips do not work on Boolean logic ad can perform massively complex tasks, while processing just a tiny amount of power. Work on neuromorphic computer chips has really picked up over the last few years, and it will only accelerate as try to imbue small computers and robots with close-to-human levels of intelligence.

More here.

 

Nick Farrell

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