Featured Articles

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

Android 4.4 is now running on more than a fifth of Android devices, according to Google’s latest figures.

More...
Nvidia introduces five new Quadro cards

Nvidia introduces five new Quadro cards

Nvidia has revamped its Quadro professional graphics line-up with a total of five new cards, two of which are based on…

More...
AMD Tonga XT graphics cards come later

AMD Tonga XT graphics cards come later

According to sources who wish to remain unnamed, we should see an AMD Tonga XT-based graphics card launched sometime in September.

More...
Nvidia Maxwell Geforce 800 comes in September

Nvidia Maxwell Geforce 800 comes in September

Nvidia was always cautious when talking about upcoming Maxwell parts, the first of which was launched back in March and based…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 11 March 2014 11:26

Boffins create thinnest LED

Written by Nick Farrell



Flexible and stackable

Researchers at University of Washington have created the world's thinnest LED that they claim is both flexible and stackable. If the research pays off it will make a new class of handheld devices and light-driven processor chips possible.

The technology is a big step in the miniaturisation of technology. Because it is still a semiconductor, you can do almost everything with it that is possible with existing, three-dimensional silicon technologies. The LEDs are three atoms tall and made from tungsten diselenide on a silicon oxide base.

Team leader Xiaodong Xu, a UW assistant professor in physics and materials science and engineering, and his graduate student Ross, have published the technique in the latest issue of Nature Nanotechnology. They claim that the LEDs are small and powerful enough to be used in optical chips that use light instead of electricity and they can be stacked to make new thin and flexible displays.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments