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Friday, 07 February 2014 11:57

Google sticks two fingers up at Russia

Written by Nick Farrell



Putin them on the spot

Google is likely to have miffed the Russians, with their medieval anti-gay stance, by sticking a rainbow version of its logo on its search page. The idea is to show up President Vladimir Putin over his bizarre "gay propaganda" law at the Sochi Winter Olympics.

The page now shows a winter sports competitor above each of the six letters in the U.S. Internet giant's name, set against backgrounds in the six colours on the gay pride flag - red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple. The search page also includes a quote from the Olympic charter underlining the right to practise sport without discrimination.

Putin signed the law last year following an ancient Russian tradition of giving into the Orthodox Church. However, this went against his PR spin of using the Games to portray Russia as a modern state that has come a long way since the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991.

Putin says the legislation, banning gay propaganda among minors, is needed to protect young people. Critics says it fosters a climate of discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) groups.

Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak said afterwards in Sochi that there would be no discrimination at the Games. However, he did stuff up that message with a face-palm quote implying that gay people might be in Russia attacking kids.

"We're all grown-ups and every adult has the right to understand their sexuality," Kozak said. But, echoing a remark by Putin, he added: "Please do not touch kids."

Nick Farrell

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