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Thursday, 16 January 2014 10:55

G-Sync monitor kit out for $199

Written by Fuad Abazovic



Nice but expensive tech

We had a chance to see a G-Sync monitor at CES 2014 and as you can imagine it does what it is supposed to do. It gets rid of the screen tears and other artefacts caused by Vertical synchronization issues and the fact that monitor and graphics card don’t really understand each other.

You get these screen tears as the GPU sends a new frame while monitor hasn’t finished drawing previous frames and starts again in the middle of drawing the frame. It looks bad and most gamers who read this have experience this before.
G-Sync synchronizes the number of frames rendered on a GPU with number of frames on screen. In case you have 70 FPS, G-Sync monitor draws 70, next frame GPU rendering drops to 50, G-Sync monitor draws 50 and keeps these two numbers synchronized. The result is buttery smooth picture that looks really nice.

Now Nvidia is going one step further with a G-Sync DIY kit for the Asus VG248QE monitor and with some skill you will be able to add G-Sync to your existing monitor, reports TechPowerUp. If you want to buy an Asus VG248QE, it will set you back a rather reasonable $279.99 (it used to sell for $399 a few weeks earlier making it really expensive), but Nvidia wants $199 for G-Sync VG248QE kit.

At the moment $199 will buy you a 27-inch entry-level full HD 27-inch monitor, but real gamers should be aiming for something a bit better than that.

The combined price for Asus VG248QE and DYI G Sync kit settles at $480 which is quite a high premium for 24-inch full HD monitor with G-Sync. Back at CES Asus announced the ROG SWIFT PG278Q G-SYNC Gaming Monitor that with a 27-inch 2560 x 1440 panel, 120 Hz refresh rate, less than 1ms latency and a price of $799. Despite the rather nice specification, this sounds like an awful lot of money.

G-Sync is definitely a nice thing to have, but not for a $199 premium, although if you can afford it, it will without a doubt make gaming smoother and more enjoyable.

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