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Thursday, 19 December 2013 14:19

Apple security allows webcam spying

Written by Nick Farrell



It is a feature

The fruit-themed cargo cult Apple which has a unique faith-based security system is in trouble after security researchers found a way to turn on their laptop cameras without anyone knowing. The move, which turns each Apple into a spy cam for any perv who hopes to find a naked Apple fangirl, is possible because Jobs’ Mob did not lock down the hardware enough.

Security experts at Johns Hopkins University have come up with a method using MacBook and iMac models released before 2008 and would probably work on later models too. Apple designed its MacBooks to block software running on the MacBook’s CPU from activating its iSight camera without turning on the light. But if you target the chip inside the camera you can switch on and off what you like.

The same flaw could also mount an attack on an Apple batteries, or built-in Apple keyboard.

Apple is of course taking the threat seriously. It will be immediately issuing security patches in a couple of days to protect its uses. Nah, not really. Apple asked a few questions about the problem and has not spoken to the researchers again. Like most things connected to security, Apple just puts its faith in the ghost of Steve Jobs to protect it from all attacks.

Nick Farrell

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