Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 28 November 2013 13:43

Siemens expects infrastructure business to become profitable

Written by Nick Farrell



Better late than never

German firm Siemens expects its Infrastructure & Cities business, which has been hit by project delays and restructuring, to reach its profitability target this financial year.

There was some speculation, brushed off by Siemens' new chief executive Joe Kaeser, that the group might dismantle the I&C business after its performance fell well short of expectations. The division looks after Siemens security systems, high-speed trains and power distribution systems.

In the financial year ended September 30, the business posted a margin on earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization of 3.7 percent, well below a target range of 8-12 percent. That made it the least profitable of Siemens' four main businesses, behind Industry, Energy and Healthcare.

It generates about $23.1 billion of annual revenue - or 23 percent of group sales - but accounted for only about 5 percent of group profit last year, hit by restructuring costs and charges related to the delayed delivery of high-speed trains.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments