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Thursday, 21 November 2013 12:43

LG to investigate spying allegations

Written by Nick Farrell



Blogger claimed that the company was monitoring users

LG is investigating claims that its TVs send details about their owners' viewing habits back to the manufacturer.

Blogger Jason Huntley detailed how his Smart TV was sending data about which channels were being watched. It appears that TVs uploaded information about the contents of devices attached to the TV, which is probably illegal. The UK Information Commissioner's Office is investigating too.

When Huntley contacted the South Korean company he was told that by using the TV he had accepted LG's terms and conditions so there. Huntley said details of what channels he had been watching had been sent even after a privacy setting had been changed.

He first come across the issue in October when he had begun researching how his Smart TV had been able to show his family tailored adverts on its user interface. When he looked at the TV's menu system, he had noticed that an option called "collection of watching info" had been switched on by default.

After switching it off, he had been surprised to find evidence that unencrypted details about each channel change had still been transmitted to LG's computer servers, but this time a flag in the data had been changed from "1" to "0" to indicate the user had opted out.

Nick Farrell

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