Featured Articles

Broadwell to be faster than Skylake-S in desktop

Broadwell to be faster than Skylake-S in desktop

Intel will do something that it never did before. It will release two processor generations at once in the desktop space.…

More...
ARM’s signs off on 64 bit ARMv8-A

ARM’s signs off on 64 bit ARMv8-A

British chip designer ARM has just signed off its 50th licensing agreement for its ARMv8-A technology, which includes support for 64-bit…

More...
Intel Business vPro market divided into 7 categories

Intel Business vPro market divided into 7 categories

Just a few years ago we had two market segments for business users. We had desktops and notebooks and now Intel…

More...
GTA 5 will make November release

GTA 5 will make November release

While we have continued to hear that Grand Theft Auto V for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC will not…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 15 November 2013 12:30

Google Books wins fair use case

Written by Nick Farrell

Summary Judgement

Google has won a case against the Authors Guild over its canning books from libraries without permission of the copyright holders. In a summary judgement in favour of Google, Judge Denny Chin said that Google's "Library Project" was a pretty good idea.

It had transformed "expressive text" into a "word index" and searchable data but did not supplant or supersede books since it was not a tool for reading books. He said that the Library added value to the original and served educational purposes, even though Google's own motive is commercial profit.

Since the project limited the amount of text it displays in response to a search and enhances, rather than detracts from, the value of the works, it amounted to fair use. Judge Chin said that Google Books provides significant public benefits. It advances the progress of the arts and sciences, while maintaining respectful consideration for the rights of authors and other creative individuals, and without adversely affecting the rights of copyright holders.

Given that the case has been rattling around the EU for a while now we expect that the Author’s Guild will appeal.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments