Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 15 November 2013 12:30

Google Books wins fair use case

Written by Nick Farrell

Summary Judgement

Google has won a case against the Authors Guild over its canning books from libraries without permission of the copyright holders. In a summary judgement in favour of Google, Judge Denny Chin said that Google's "Library Project" was a pretty good idea.

It had transformed "expressive text" into a "word index" and searchable data but did not supplant or supersede books since it was not a tool for reading books. He said that the Library added value to the original and served educational purposes, even though Google's own motive is commercial profit.

Since the project limited the amount of text it displays in response to a search and enhances, rather than detracts from, the value of the works, it amounted to fair use. Judge Chin said that Google Books provides significant public benefits. It advances the progress of the arts and sciences, while maintaining respectful consideration for the rights of authors and other creative individuals, and without adversely affecting the rights of copyright holders.

Given that the case has been rattling around the EU for a while now we expect that the Author’s Guild will appeal.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments