Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 20 June 2008 09:07

Fraudulent ATM information travels the Globe

Written by David Stellmack

Image

From Indiana to Russia, Ukraine, Turkey and the Czech Republic


A bank server was compromised at 1st Source Bank in South Bend, Indiana on May 12th. When the bank discovered the server breach, the bank reportedly disabled all of its own ATM cards that were thought to be compromised. This past weekend, however, there were a flood of fraudulent ATM transactions occurring in places as far away as Turkey, Ukraine, Russia and the Czech Republic that appear to be linked to the server intrusion.

The breached server contained debit card transaction data belonging to customers of 1st Source and other financial institutions who used 1st Source ATMs. At least 200 consumers in Indiana who have accounts with 1st Source, Teachers Credit Union (TCU) and Farm Bureau Credit Union have reported fraudulent ATM activity that has occurred to their accounts since this past weekend. The majority of the ATM withdrawals were $200 to $300 each, or limited to the maximum amount of daily withdrawal on the account.

Data security and cybercrime are part of a global market for stolen credit card data and banking data.  A security vendor, Finjan Inc, just released a report that a huge underground market exists for stolen credit and debit card data.  The company claims that this information can often be purchased by doing a Google search and paying as little as $20 per stolen card.

Last modified on Friday, 20 June 2008 09:28

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments