Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 17 September 2013 09:21

Iran lifts Facebook, Twitter bans

Written by Peter Scott

Tweet the Casbah

The Islamic Republic of Iran seems to be coming to its senses. Earlier this year the country elected reformist Hassan Rouhani as the new president, although we will miss Ahmadinejad’s antics at the UN.

Unlike his predecessor, Rouhani has already used social media to comment on world events and even send Rosh Hashanan greetings to the Jewish community. There is even talk of rapprochement with the west on Iran’s controversial nuclear programme.

To top it all off, as of Monday internet users in Iran can access Twitter and Facebook without restrictions. Usually they had to get round a government firewall to have their voice heard. Iranian authorities started blocking social media in the aftermath of the failed revolution of 2009. With Ahmadinejad out of the picture, fewer people should take to the streets.

The move could also get Rouhani a bit more support in progressive circles and irk hard-liners. Persian Spring anyone?

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments