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Friday, 09 August 2013 08:22

Nvidia open sources Shield

Written by Nick Farrell

You probably were not expecting this

Nvidia is open sourcing the platform behind its Shield console. It is not too much of a step really. Shield is powered by NVidia’s Tegra 4 processor but runs Android.

The GPU outfit has said that the Shield is an ‘open gaming platform’ that allows for ‘an open ecosystem’ enabling developers to develop content as well as applications that would take advantage of the underlying hardware and which can be enjoyed on bigger displays as well as mobile screen.

Nvidia has named its open software project as Develop For SHIELD (Develop4SHIELD), mostly because the company seems unable to take the caps lock off for any of its product names.

Nvidia has said that even though it encourages developers to root the SHIELD console, the warranty policy does allow it to reject returns of devices where either the bootloader has been unlocked or the device has been rooted. Nvidia said that it did not want to discourage people from rooting their devices, but to give us a course of action if folks start to abuse the hardware through software modifications.

Nick Farrell

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